Edge of Building 66, MIT.

Edge of Building 66, MIT.

Hybridity by Shani Mootoo

Point of convergence
Union of way back then, back home and home
Where I depend neither on memory or desire
Where I am neither mendhi, baigan, or steel pan
Nor
Mindless of these

Seamless juncture
As in mulligatawny that cooks long and slow
Neither Jeera, cardamom, hurdi, nor clove
stand alone

Hybridity
As in: “offspring of tame sow and wild boar
Child of freeman and slave”
Some concoction, some new stew or callallaoo
Spotted variegated deformed crude new

Calcottawarima
Persimangorangegerapear
Pomeracappleplummecythere
Gorakpurcapachaimavancouverlaromainottawa
Coconutcashewpeachskookummuckalapaninaanaani

Weither neither Nepalese great-grandmother
Mother, lover, nor government can define I
Nor
am I
Mindless of these

 

To live in diaspora is to be haunted by histories that sit uncomfortably out of joint, ambivalently ahead of their time and yet behind it too. It is to feel a small tingle on the skin at the back of your neck and know that something is not quite right about where you are now, but to know also that you cannot leave. To be un-homed is a process. To be unhomely is a state of diasporic consciousness.
Lily Cho, The Turn to Diaspora (via et—ceteralilne)

(via kalisherni)

BLADE RUNNER (1982) dir. Ridley Scott, opening sequence (FX Storyboards)

via neighborhoodthreat

(via neighborhoodthreat-deactivated2)

archiveofaffinities:

Franco Raggi, Unstable Element in the Desert: The Column, 1976

archiveofaffinities:

Franco Raggi, Unstable Element in the Desert: The Column, 1976

(Source: violentsex, via d-y-s-t-o-p-i-a)

teapotify:

six-one-nine:

ليدي دجاجا

this can also be ليدي طقاقة

teapotify:

six-one-nine:

ليدي دجاجا

this can also be ليدي طقاقة

I’m not going to try to be an academic or historian, but if you look at the Arab world over the centuries, cities themselves have been much better at negotiating conflict, negotiating community, and forging a broader sense of identity that can embrace diversity. I see that hyperlocal identity becoming more prominent and more powerful in a lot of different places. I see it in northern Iraq, I see it on the Turkish-Syrian border, I see it in some ways in Lebanon. In these places you don’t have to become Sunni or Shia or Christian or Muslim or Lebanese or Syrian or Turkish. These smaller identities go on and on until it’s mind-numbing. Your other identities are embraced within this larger notion of the urban sense of self. I see that returning and I think that’s very hopeful, even for a place like Marjayoun. There’s the possibility that you can be Marjayouni instead of Lebanese or Greek Orthodox. I think it’s a century-long process, but when it comes to identity, it’s a source of hope that I see.

bint battuta: Anthony Shadid, in Reclaiming What Was Lost: A Conversation with Anthony Shadid

 
shorterexcerpts:

walpaper:

laureola:

How Popular Science, in 1925, thought the world was going to be like in 1950.click on picture or here to see it bigger
(via colorexplorer, jennul, vintagefuture, robotindisguise)

shorterexcerpts:

walpaper:

laureola:

How Popular Science, in 1925, thought the world was going to be like in 1950.
click on picture or here to see it bigger

(via colorexplorer, jennul, vintagefuture, robotindisguise)

architizer:

Paper engineering: a 1970s pattern book for the old city of Prague.

architizer:

Paper engineering: a 1970s pattern book for the old city of Prague.

touba:

Instructional calligraphic piece in naskh script by the Ottoman calligrapher Muhammad Shafiq, c. 1852 or 1853.*

touba:

Instructional calligraphic piece in naskh script by the Ottoman calligrapher Muhammad Shafiq, c. 1852 or 1853.*

(via bintbattuta)

When design kills: The criminalization of walking

"Students of urban planning and design talk about a phenomenon known as "desire lines." In French, the language of origin for the expression, it’s "chemins du désir." Paths of desire. Some people call them “intention lines.”

Whatever words you use, they are a phenomenon recognizable to anyone. They are the paths traced along the ground by living creatures trying to get from one point to another. The ribbons of dirt worn in the grass.

For centuries, designers and planners have used these paths to determine where they would put the paved streets of their cities, or the walking paths of their campuses and parks…

You can see desire lines worn into the surface of grass. You cannot see them on asphalt.”

- Ronald Flexner, Ink Bubble Drawings

- Ronald Flexner, Ink Bubble Drawings

ethel-baraona:

The Elements of the House. Poem written by Raimund Abraham in New York, 1972
via @a_small_lab +  dpr-barcelona

ethel-baraona:

The Elements of the House. Poem written by Raimund Abraham in New York, 1972

via @a_small_lab +  dpr-barcelona

drawingarchitecture:

Robert Gilson on Quarantena

drawingarchitecture:

Robert Gilson on Quarantena

blog comments powered by Disqus